Kerschenbach

Kerschenbach

Coat of arms

Kerschenbach

Location of Kerschenbach within Vulkaneifel district 

Coordinates: 50°20′56″N 6°30′06″E / 50.34889°N 6.50167°E / 50.34889; 6.50167Coordinates: 50°20′56″N 6°30′06″E / 50.34889°N 6.50167°E / 50.34889; 6.50167

Country
Germany

State
Rhineland-Palatinate

District
Vulkaneifel

Municipal assoc.
Obere Kyll

Government

 • Mayor
Walter Schneider

Area

 • Total
6.92 km2 (2.67 sq mi)

Population (2015-12-31)[1]

 • Total
208

 • Density
30/km2 (78/sq mi)

Time zone
CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)

Postal codes
54589

Dialling codes
06597

Vehicle registration
DAU

Kerschenbach is an Ortsgemeinde – a municipality belonging to a Verbandsgemeinde, a kind of collective municipality – in the Vulkaneifel district in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. It belongs to the Verbandsgemeinde of Obere Kyll, whose seat is in the municipality of Jünkerath.

Contents

1 Geography

1.1 Location

2 History
3 Politics

3.1 Municipal council
3.2 Mayor
3.3 Coat of arms

4 Culture and sightseeing

4.1 Buildings

5 References
6 External links

Geography[edit]
Location[edit]
The municipality lies in the Vulkaneifel, a part of the Eifel known for its volcanic history, geographical and geological features, and even ongoing activity today, including gases that sometimes well up from the earth.
Kerschenbach sits at an elevation of 550 m above sea level, and has an area of 691 ha. In the north, it borders on the state of North Rhine-Westphalia.
History[edit]
When Kerschenbach came into being is lost in the mists of time. The placename ending —bach points to beginnings in the time of the clearings in the Eifel, putting them in the 12th century.
The name “Kerschenbach” is closely tied to the like-named brook. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the village was called Kirschembach. The determinative Kerschen— goes back to the Old High German word kar, meaning “dale” or “hollow”. Kerschenbach therefore means “Dalebrook”
Unlike what has been unearthed in other, nearby municipalities, no traces of Roman occupation have come to light in Kerschenbach. There was some excitement when building works at the new village square brought up some ceramic piping that was thought might be Roman. However, the discovery turned into a disappointment when it became clear that the old pipes w

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